MOST people don’t know that sleeping protects you against illnesses.

Following International Sleep Awareness Week last week, SunHealth spoke to Dr Robert Daniel, a specialist eye doctor, who said: “Lack of sleep compromises your immune system. Health professionals are encouraging South Africans to find ways of boosting their immune systems in order to reduce their vulnerability to viruses including COVID-19,

He said research has shown that people who don’t get enough quality sleep are more likely to get sick after being exposed to a virus.

Lack of sleep can also affect how fast you recover if you do get sick.

“During sleep, your immune system releases proteins called cytokines, which help promote sleep. Certain cytokines need to increase when you have an infection or inflammation, or when you’re under stress,” he said.

Sleep deprivation may decrease production of these protective cytokines.

In addition, infection-fighting antibodies and cells are reduced during periods when you don’t get enough sleep.

Cytokines are both produced and released during sleep, causing a double whammy if you skimp on sleep.

Chronic sleep loss can also reduce the effectiveness of flu vaccines by reducing your body’s ability to respond.

According to the Sleep Foundation, to stay healthy, especially during the influenza season, you need to get the recommended seven to eight hours of sleep a night.

This will help keep your immune system strong, while also protecting you from other health issues, including heart disease, diabetes and obesity.

  • To build a strong immune system you should also: Wash your hands with soap regularly) Avoid close contact with people who are ill) Take vitamin C and multivitamin supplements) Eat well) Get a flu injection.

Are you sleeping enough? Blue light from electronic devices, televisions and LED lights reduces the body’s ability to manufacture the sleep hormone melatonin, which is needed for good quality sleep.

SleepSpec are amber tinted glasses that absorb blue light in our environment and allow the body to produce melatonin.

Melatonin helps boost immune system: aside from assisting the body to sleep, melatonin is also an essential hormone for immune support and disease prevention.

As we age, our T-cells, which regulate our immune response and fight diseases, become less effective. This breaks down our immune systems.

Melatonin increases T-cell activity, which creates a more powerful antibody response and helps us fight viruses. It also supports the thyroid, which bolsters our immune system”.