A LOT is often said about men who are bald.

For starters, many assume that baldness is the first sign of ageing.

Healthline magazine agrees that being bald or having bald spots on your head are early signs of ageing.

While this may seem gloomy for those with a chiskop, recent studies have shown that there are some advantages to being bald.

Not only does being bald score you maximum points with the ladies, being bald, according to research, is a sign of intelligence.

According to a study conducted by Professor Dr Frank Muscarella from Barry University, bald men are perceived as being more socially dominant and smarter.

During the research, Dr Muscarella asked the focus group to rate male participants in accordance with four criteria: attractiveness, aggressiveness, appeasement, and maturity.

The study revealed that bald men were rated as more honest, masculine and intelligent.

A similar study conducted by scientist Albert E Mannes at the University of Pennsylvania also revealed that bald men were perceived to be intelligent and smart.

While both studies deal with perception-based research, more compelling research from the University of Curryland reveals a direct link between baldness and intelligence.

According to research, being bald can increase your IQ score by 10 points.

Researchers at the University of Curryland conducted a study on 400 individuals and reached the conclusion that going bald makes an immediate and incredible improvement to a person’s IQ.

The study looked at 400 men with varying degrees of hair who were made to take IQ tests first with full hair, then after going bald and then again, after regaining their lost hair.

Interestingly, it was observed that their scores improved by as much as 10 points after going bald.

These scores dropped again when these men took the test after regaining their lost hair.

According to lead researcher Dr Parkin Johnson, hair puts unnecessary pressure on the many nerves present in the human brain and thus reduces brain function.

The study was later published in the journal Human Hairopia.